Ragtime and Anti-Bolshevism
http://dx.doi.org/10.5429/2079-3871(2011)v2i1-2.8en

Brian Holder

Abstract


In 1918 the popular composer George Cobb published his “Russian Rag” – a ragtime rendition of Sergei Rachmaninoff’s Prelude in C# Minor. This work embodied the social and political concerns of the era, specifically global radicalism, immigration from Eastern Europe, and the use of ragtime as musical parody. Through an examination of this and other period works it can be shown that ragtime and popular song were used as a medium to conceptualize and transmit these concepts. Furthermore, this literature exhibits the rapid evolution of mainstream discourse on Russian immigrant culture in the years that followed the First World War.

Keywords


ragtime, Bolshevism, parody, Rachmaninoff

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References


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